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Other Notations

'obj equivalent to (quote obj)
`obj equivalent to (quasi-quote obj)
,obj equivalent to (unquote obj)
,@obj equivalent to (unquote-splicing obj)
#t represents true in Scheme
#f represents false in Scheme
#(obj ...) represents a vector whose elements are obj ...
[ ] Left and right square brackets have no special meaning in KSM-Scheme. They can constitue identifiers as usual characters.
{ } Left and right curly braces have no special meaning in KSM-Scheme. They can constitue identifiers as usual characters.
| Vertical bar has no special meaning in KSM-Scheme. It can constitue identifiers as usual character.
#<eof> Represents the end of file object.
#<unspecified> Represents an unspecified value.

The standard boolean objects for true and false are written as #t and #f. What really matters, though, are the objects that the Scheme conditional expressions (if, cond, and, ...) treat as true or false. The phrase "a true value" (or sometimes just "true") means any object other than the object represented by #f. The phrase "a false value" (or "false") means the object represented by #f. In this sense, the empty list and the symbol nil are "true values" in Scheme.


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