Japanese Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery Vol43,No3

A Case of Aortic Valve Replacement after Long-Term Antifungal Treatment of Candidemia

Takanori KonoEiki TayamaHidetsugu Hori
Tomohiro UedaKenichi ImasakaTakeaki Harada and Yukihiro Tomita

(Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Clinical Research Center, Kyushu Medical Center, Fukuoka, Japan)

We report a patient with candidemia, and remote organ infection, who underwent surgical treatment of aortic valvular stenosis. The patient was a 77-year-old man. Candida glabrata was detected in a blood culture during pharmacological treatment for pyelonephritis associated with vesicoureteral transition stenosis. A ureteral stent had been placed to preserve urine outflow, and vesicoureteral surgery had been scheduled. However, the urological surgery had to be performed first because of severe aortic valvular stenosis. After long-term(5months)of antifungal treatment, Candida was no longer detected in the urine or blood cultures, but the serum β-D-glucan level did not fall below the reference value(21.6pg/ml at the last measurement). It was difficult to control the infection further, and we decided to perform aortic valve replacement. There was no evidence of endocarditis at surgery, but pathological examination revealed traces of the fungus in the tissue of the aortic valve. The post-operative course was uneventful, and urological surgery was carried out 45 days later. Infection recurred when the antifungal medication was temporarily discontinued. The infection was then controlled by resumption of the antifungal medication. The patient has been free of recurrence for the past year since the aortic valve replacement. In the present case, in which a mycosis from a remote source was not readily eradicated prior to valve replacement, we were able to obtain good results by first administering long-term antifungal medication to quell the inflammation as much as possible.

 

Jpn. J. Cardiovasc. Surg. 43:124-128(2014)

Keywords:candidemia;aortic valvular stenosis;mycotic endocarditis


Copyright ©2014 By Japanese Society for Cardiovascular Surgery All rights reserved.

PAGE TOP ▲